Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Maine Coon

Maine Coon

Description: Maine Coons are the second largest breed of domestic cat. Males weigh from 15 to 25 lb (6.8 to 11.3 kg) with females weighing from 10 to 15 lb (4.5 to 6.8 kg). The height of adults can vary between 10 and 16 in (25 and 41 cm) and they can reach a length of up to 48 in (120 cm), including the tail, which can reach a length of 14 in (36 cm) and is long, tapering, and heavily furred, almost resembling a raccoon's tail. The body is solid and muscular, which is necessary for supporting their own weight, and the chest is broad. Maine Coons possess a rectangular body shape and are slow to physically mature; their full potential size is normally not reached until they are three to five years old, while other cats take about only one year.

Character: Maine Coons are known as the "gentle giants" and possess above-average intelligence, making them relatively easy to train. They are known for being loyal to their family and cautious—but not mean—around strangers, but are independent and not clingy. The Maine Coon is generally not known for being a "lap cat" but their gentle disposition makes the breed relaxed around dogs, other cats, and children. They are playful throughout their lives, with males tending to be more clownish and females generally possessing more dignity, yet both are equally affectionate.  Many Maine Coons have a fascination with water and some theorize that this personality trait comes from their ancestors, who were aboard ships for much of their lives. Maine Coons are also well known for being very vocal cats. They are known for their frequent yowling, chattering, chirping, "talking" (especially "talking back" to their owners), and making other loud vocalizations.

Published in Cats
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Siamese

Siamese

The Siamese cat is one of the first distinctly recognized breeds of Oriental cat. One of several breeds native to Thailand (formerly known as Siam), the Siamese cat became one of the most popular breeds in Europe and North America in the 20th century. he modern Siamese is characterized by blue almond-shaped eyes, a triangular head shape, large ears, an elongated, slender, and muscular body, and point coloration.

Appearance: The breed standard of the modern Siamese calls for an elongated, tubular, and muscular body and a triangular head, forming a perfect triangle from the tip of the nose to each tip of the ear. The eyes are almond-shaped and light blue, while the ears are large, wide-based, and positioned more towards the side of the head. The breed has a long neck, a slender tail, and fur that is short, glossy, fine, and adheres to the body with no undercoat. Its pointed color scheme and blue eyes distinguish it from the closely related Oriental Shorthair. The modern Siamese shares the pointed color pattern with the Thai, or traditional Siamese, but they differ in head and body type.

Temperament: Siamese are usually very affectionate and intelligent cats, renowned for their social nature. Many enjoy being with people and are sometimes described as "extroverts". Often they bond strongly to a single person. Some Siamese are extremely vocal, with a loud, low-pitched voice—known as "Meezer", from which they get one of their nicknames—that has been compared to the cries of a human baby, and persistent in demanding attention. These cats are typically active and playful, even as adults, and are often described as more dog-like in behavior than other cats.

Published in Cats
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Birman

Birman

The Birman, also called the "Sacred Cat of Burma", is a domestic cat breed. The Birman is a long-haired, colorpointed cat distinguished by a silky coat, deep blue eyes and contrasting white "gloves" on each paw. The breed name is derived from Birmanie, the French form of Burma.

Appearance: Birmans have a medium sized, rectangular body with a broad face and distinct Roman nose. Their ears are ideally as wide on the base as they are tall and should be set as much on top of the head as on the side. The eyes are rounded and should be a deep sapphire blue. The Birman's fur is medium-long and should have a silky texture. Unlike a Persian or Himalayan, they have no undercoat, and are thus much less prone to matting. Coat colour is always pointed, save for the contrasting pure white, symmetrical "gloves" on each paw that are the trademark of the breed. The white must involve all toes and in front must stop at the articulation or at the transition of toes to metacarpals. These gloves should extend noticeably further up the back of the leg (referred to as the "laces"), finishing with an inverted V extended 1/2 to 3/4 up the hock. Any other spot of white on the points is considered a serious fault. The base body colour is white to cream, with a wash of color that corresponds to the points but is much paler. Recognized point colours are seal, chocolate, blue, lilac (a softer silver-grey), red or cream. Tabby and tortie variations in seal, chocolate, blue or lilac are also allowed; other colours are in development.

As A pet: Because this breed enjoys the company of other pets and people, it is best suited in a multi-pet household rather than being a home-alone cat. Don’t worry about your valuables displayed on high shelves. This breed prefers to hang out at ground level rather than climb curtains or hang out on high perches. Its coat needs minimal care – just run a comb through once or twice a week to maintain its silky feel.

Published in Cats
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Bengal

Bengal

Appearance: Bengal cats have "wild-looking" markings, such as large spots, rosettes, and a light/white belly, and a body structure reminiscent of the leopard cat. A Bengal's rosetted spots occur only on the back and sides, with stripes elsewhere. The breed typically also features "mascara" (horizontal striping alongside the eyes), and foreleg striping. The Bengal cat is usually either classed as brown-spotted or snow-spotted (although there are more colours, brown and snow are the only colours of Bengal that the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy (UK) recognize). Within brown Bengals, there are either marble or spotted markings. Included in the spotted variation is rosetted, which consists of a spot with a dark line surrounding it. Snow Bengals are also either marble or spotted, but are also divided into blue-eyed or Any Other Colour eyes. The International Cat Association recognizes several Bengal colours (brown, seal lynx point, mink, sepia, silver) and patterns (spotted and marbled) for competition. In the New Traits class, other colours may be shown, as well as longhairs.

Temperament and Health: After three generations from the original crossing, the breed usually acquires a gentle domestic cat temperament; however, for the typical pet owner, a Bengal cat kept as a pet should be at least four generations (F4) removed from the leopard cat. The so-called "foundation cats" from the first three filial generations of breeding (F1–F3) are usually reserved for breeding purposes or the specialty pet home environment.

Published in Cats
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Himalayan

Himalayan

The Himalayan cat is one of the most beautiful cats with its blue eyes and long, silky fur. The book entitled "Longhair Cats", written by Grace Pond and published by Barron's in 1984, describes the physical characteristics of the Himalayan breed of cat. Their bodies are light in color with darker areas called points. These areas are the ears, tail, feet, legs, and the masked section of the face.

Color: The blue point Himalayan has deep blue eyes, and the pads of the feet and the nose are gray. Its body is a shade of white that has a touch of blue which fades to white on the abdomen and breast. The points of this cat are a shade of blue.

Temperament: Himalayans have a very gentle, laid-back personality, and they are not usually rambunctious. This well-liked breed of cat requires regular grooming to prevent hairballs and matting, but otherwise they are easy to care for and make wonderful pets. These cats are sweet-tempered, intelligent and generally very social and good companions. Because of their heritage from the Siamese cats they tend to be more active than Persians. Himmies, as fanciers call them, are perfect indoor cat companions. They are gentle, calm, and sweet-tempered, but they possess a playful side as well. Like the Siamese, Himalayans love to play fetch, and a scrap of crumpled paper or a kitty toy will entertain them for hours.

Published in Cats
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Exotic Shorthair

Exotic Shorthair

Description:
Head: Round, massive. Very broad skull. Rounded forehead. Round, full cheeks. Short, broad, round muzzle. Short, broad nose with pronounced stop. Strong chin. Broad, powerful jaws.
Ears: Small, rounded at the tip, not too open at the base. Widely spaced and well-furnished with hair on the inside.
Eyes: Large, round, well-spaced. Pure, deep color corresponding to that of the coat (gold to copper in most varieties; green in the chinchilla and the golden; blue in the white and the colorpoint).
Neck: Short and thick.
Body: Medium in size, cobby, low to the ground. Broad chest. Massive shoulders. Large-boned, powerful muscles. Weight: 3,5 - 6 kilogram.
Paw: Short, straight, and large. Round, large paws. Tufts of hair between the toes are desirable.
Tail: Short, thick, carried low. Rounded tip .

Coat: Shorthaired but slightly longer than that of other shorthaired breeds. Dense, fluffy, erect hair. All Persian colors are recognized.

Temperament: Exotic Shorthairs have a gentle and calm personality reminiscent of the Persian, but are livelier than their longhaired ancestors. Curious and playful, they are friendly to other cats and dogs. They don’t like being left alone, and need the presence of their owner (or of voices or smells reminiscent of their owner, such as a radio). They tend to show more affection and loyalty than most breeds and make excellent lap cats.

Published in Cats
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Scottish Fold

Scottish Fold

Characteristics: All Folds are born with straight, unfolded ears, and those with the Fold gene will begin to show the fold usually within about 21 days. The kittens that do not develop folded ears are known as Straights. The Scottish fold is a medium cat with a rounded, well-padded body and a short, dense, and resilient coat. It has large, round, broadly spaced eyes full of sweetness; well-rounded whisker pads and a short nose with a gentle curve in profile.

Temperament: Scottish Folds, whether with folded ears or with normal ears, are typically good-natured and placid and adjust to other animals within a household extremely well. They tend to become very attached to their human caregivers and are by nature quite affectionate. Folds receive high marks for playfulness, affection, and grooming, and are often intelligent, loyal, softspoken, and adaptable to home situations, people and children.

Health: The typical lifespan of a Scottish Fold is 15 years.

Habits: Folds are also known for sleeping on their backs. Scottish Folds typically have soft voices and display a complex repertoire of meows and purrs not found in better-known breeds. Folds are also known for sitting with their legs stretched out and their paws on their belly. This is called the "Buddha Position".

Published in Cats
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

British Shorthair

British Shorthair

British Shorthair is a very muscular cat, with a "square" body shape and thick legs. Because of its bulk and muscle, it is nicknamed the bulldog of the cat world. British Shorthairs have large, broad heads. Their eyes stand out and tend to be large and round. Their relatively small ears with rounded tips are set far apart, making the head look domed. They have pert snub noses and slightly rounded chins which help emphasise the breed's powerful jaw and round head.

Temperament: British Shorthairs are an easygoing breed of cat; they tend to be safe around children as they will tolerate a fair amount of physical interaction and hiss or scratch very rarely. They have a stable character and take well to being kept as indoor-only cats, making them ideal for apartment living. They are not terribly demanding of attention, though they will let their owner know if they feel like playing. They enjoy mouse type or stick style toys. They are not hyperactive cats, preferring to sit close to their owners rather than on them.

Care: British Shorthairs do not require a lot of grooming as their fur does not tangle or mat easily. However, it is recommended that the coat be brushed occasionally, especially during seasonal shedding, since they may develop hairballs at this time. British Shorthairs can be prone to obesity when desexed or kept indoors, so care should be taken with their diet.

Published in Cats
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Persian

Persian

Tradional persian cat: The CFA however regulates the "flat faced" Persian as the true breed and standard for this breed.

Character: Massive cobby body, short legs and a broad, round head with a short, snub and broad nose. They are good with other pets, and with children. They're very adaptable, and usually cope well if changes occur such as additions to the family, new pets or a house move.

Temperament: Generally a quiet cat. Homely and placid affection to owners, friendly towards strangers, clean, vocal and fussiness over food.

Care: They need regular grooming to prevent matting. Their eyes may require regular cleaning to prevent crust build-up and tear staining. The Persian Cats doesn’t require much exercise and is well suited to apartment living.

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