Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Cockatiel

Cockatiel

Color mutation: Fifteen different Cockatiel colour mutations are currently established in aviculture, including Grey, Pied, Pearled, Cinnamon, Whitefaced, Lutino, Albino (aka. Whitefaced Lutino) and Yellowcheeked Cockatiels. There are many mutations of Cockatiels with varied colors, they are: Silvestre, Harlequin, Lutino, Cinnamon, opaline (Pearl), Cara Black, Silver, Fawn, Albino (there is a pattern and not just albino genetic mutations), Pastel, Silver and Recessive silver dominant. At 300 mm to 330 mm (12 to 13 inches), the cockatiel is the smallest and only parakeet type of Cackatoo species. The latter ranaging between 300 mm to 600 mm (12-24 inches) in length.

Lifespan: The Cockatiel's lifespan in captivity is generally given as 15–20 years, though it is sometimes given as short as 10–15 years, and there are reports of Cockatiels living as long as 32 years, the oldest confirmed specimen reported being 36 years old. Diet and exercise are major determining factors in cockatiel lifespan.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Rosella

Rosella

Description: rosellas are medium-sized parrots with long tails.The feathers on their backs show an obvious scalloping appearance with colouring that differs between the species. All species have distinctive cheek patches. Sexual dimorphism is absent or slight - males and females generally have similar plumage, apart from the Western Rosella. The juveniles of the blue-cheeked species, and Western Rosella, all have a distinctive green-based plumage, while immature plumage of the white-cheeked species is merely a duller version of the adults.

Habitat: Rosellas are native to Australia and nearby islands, where they inhabit forests, woodlands, farmlands, and suburban parks and gardens.

Behaviour: Rosellas feed predominantly on seeds and fruit, with food held in the foot. They enjoy bathing in puddles of water in the wild and in captivity. Rosellas scratch their heads with the foot behind the wing. Mutual preening is not exhibited by the genus, and the courtship display is simple; the male waves his tail sideways, and engages in some head bobbing, and the female reciprocates.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Ringneck Parakeet

Ringneck Parakeet

Common Name: Indian Ringneck Parakeet, Indian Ringneck Parrot, Rose-Ringed Parrot. Size: Medium, at about 16 inches in length including the tailfeathers.

Averange Lifespan: Between 25 - 30 years, although instances of Ringnecks living past the age of fifty have been authenticated.

Temperament: Although the Indian Ringneck has something of a reputation for being nippy and hard to tame, it is largely undeserved. Because they are so smart, Ringnecks get bored very easily, and will often resort to chewing and other destructive behavior if left to their own devices. They also go through a bluffing stage during adolescence that is difficult for some owners to manage. Ringnecks that are handled often and properly cared for, however, generally have sweet, charming personalities that make them a favorite of bird enthusiasts everywhere.

Colors: Ringnecks are available in shades ranging from bright yellows, greens, and blues, to albinos. Like a few other bird species, they are known as dimorphic, meaning that a bird's sex can be determined by its colors and markings. Males sport deep red beaks, black facial markings, and three bands or color around their necks. Females, while still beautiful, lack the facial and collar bands, although some do display a barely slight darkening of color around their necks.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Yellow Crown Amazon

Yellow Crown Amazon

The yellow-crowned amazon or yellow-crowned parrot (Amazona ochrocephala), is a species of parrot, native to the tropical South America and Panama. The taxonomy is highly complex, and the yellow-headed (A. oratrix) and yellow-naped amazon (A. auropalliata) are sometimes considered subspecies of the yellow-crowned amazon. The Yellow-crowned Amazon is generally green with yellow-green on the under parts. Its name is derived from the patch of yellow the crown. There are dark black edges to the feathers on the back of the head, and a bright red on the edge of its wing and speculum. The tail is also yellow-green underneath with a red spot at the base of each feather. The eye is orange surrounded by an unfeathered white ring. The beak is light gray with some pink on the upper part close to the base, and the legs are gray. Food and Breeding: They are normally found in pairs or small flocks up to 30, but larger groups may gather at clay licks. Their food includes fruits, nuts, seeds and berries. Foods with sugar and a large amount of salt can be dangerous for them.

Behaviour: The Yellow-fronted Amazon is a very fun, smart and affectionate parrot. These birds are quite intelligent so are easy to tame and train. They will quickly begin to mimic sounds and can become a very good talker. Being very social, they enjoy companionship and become fast friends with their owner.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Blue Fronted Amazon

Blue Fronted Amazon

The blue-fronted amazon (Amazona aestiva), also called the turquoise-fronted amazon and blue-fronted parrot, is a South American species of amazon parrot and one of the most common amazon parrots kept in captivity as a pet or companion parrot. Its common name is derived from the distinctive blue marking on its head just above its beak. The blue-fronted amazon is a mainly green parrot about 38 cm (15 in) long. They have blue feathers on the forehead above the beak and yellow on the face and crown. Distribution of blue and yellow varies greatly among individuals. Unlike most other Amazona parrots, its beak is mostly black. There is no overt sexual dimorphism to the human eye, but analysis of the feathers using spectrometry, a method which allows the plumage to be seen as it would be by a parrot's tetrachromatic vision, shows clear differences between the plumage of the sexes. Juveniles of parrots are duller and have dark irises.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Double Yellow Headed Amazon

Double Yellow Headed Amazon

Scientific Name: Amazona oratrix. Description: Double Yellow-Headed Amazons are quite large, measuring about 16 inches in length from the beak to the tip of the tail feathers.

Temperament: Double Yellow-Headed Amazons make wonderful, affectionate pets when handfed and raised from a young age. Highly gifted and possessing incredible speech abilities, the Double Yellow-Headed Amazon is a charming bird who loves being the center of attention. Like many parrots, however, Double Yellow-Headed Amazons may go through a hormonal bluffing stage as they reach sexual maturity. For this reason, they are recommended for experienced bird owners.

Colors: Mostly green, these birds feature bright yellow feathers on their heads and faces, with splashes of yellow and red on the front edges of the wings. They have horn colored beaks and flesh colored feet.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Yellow Naped Amazon

Yellow Naped Amazon

The yellow-naped amazon or yellow-naped parrot (Amazona auropalliata) is an amazon parrot sometimes considered to be a subspecies of yellow-crowned amazon, Amazona ochrocephala.

Description: The yellow-naped amazon is distinguished by its green forehead and crown and a yellow band across the lower nape (back part of neck) and hindneck. The beak is dark gray and is paler towards the base of the upper mandible. The feet are also dark gray. Yellow-naped amazons are highly sought after for their talking ability and playful personalities. They are also known for nest-protective behaviors that often lead them to bite. This is particularly common in, but not limited to, males during the breeding season. A rare blue mutation of the yellow-naped amazon is known to exist, in which the entire body is turquoise in color.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Sulphur Crested Cockatoo

Sulphur Crested Cockatoo

Traits: Sulpher-crested cockatoos sociable and playful. They are also demanding birds that need plenty of interaction and cuddle time. They are smart and known for solving puzzles and other games. Sulphur-crested cockatoos can be more independent than other cockatoo species, so get to know your bird’s likes and dislikes. Adult breeder birds of this species are more aloof than those that are hand-raised. Hand-raised babies make the best pets because they develop a more playful attitude and are not demanding pet birds if given enough to do. The larger sulphur-crested cockatoos need more time devoted to training and socializing so that bad behaviors do not develop. To keep these pet birds happy, they need at least one hour of playtime a day as well as exercise time with their owner and several more hours of supervised out-of-the-cage time.

Behavior/Health Concerns: A stressful household or a lack of the appropriate amount of human interaction can cause bad behavior in these somewhat high-strung pet birds. Sulpher-crested cockatoos also need a range of activities to keep them busy when they are not interacting with humans. If they are not given adequate chewing toys, they will find household items to chew. While these pet birds need attention and time with humans, they must also learn how to be independent and not become accustomed to an excessive amount of human attention. This pet bird does best in a home where it is the only bird. Sulpher-crested cockatoos can become territorial once they have matured and they are often destructive chewers. Without enough mental and physical stimulation, they can resort to destructive behaviors such as feather picking. They are susceptible to psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD), fatty liver disease, obesity and bumblefoot. Sulpher-crested cockatoos are known to be dusty birds, and which is a concern for those with allergies.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Umbrella Cockatoo

Umbrella Cockatoo

The White Cockatoo is around 46 cm (18 in) long, and weighs about 400 g (14 oz) for small females and up to 800 g (28 oz) for big males. The male White Cockatoo usually has a broader head and a bigger beak than the female. They have brown or black eyes and a dark grey beak. When mature some female White Cockatoos can have reddish/brown irises, while the irises of the adult male are dark brown or black. The feathers of the White Cockatoo are mostly white. However, both upper and lower surfaces of the inner half of the trailing edge of the large wing feathers are a yellow color. The yellow color on the underside of the wings is most notable because the yellow portion of the upper surface of the feather is covered by the white of the feather immediately medial (nearer to the body) and above. Similarly, areas of larger tail feathers that are covered by other tail feathers – and the innermost covered areas of the larger crest feathers – are yellow. Short white feathers grow from and closely cover the upper legs. The feathers of this species and others create a powder similar to talcum powder that easily transfers to clothing.

Food and feeding: In the wild, White Cockatoos feed on berries, seeds, nuts, fruit and roots. When nesting, they include insects and insect larvae.

Behaviour: White Cockatoos are kept as pets because they can be very affectionate, bond closely with people and are valued for their beauty. Cockatoos are also noisier than many parrots. They can become very bonded (or dependent) on human companion and this combined with their long life and often misunderstood behaviors can lead to behavior issues.. They have very strong beaks, and umbrellas are capable of breaking walnuts and fingers if very scared.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Scarlet Macaw Parrot

Scarlet Macaw Parrot

Description: It is about 81 centimetres (32 in) long, of which more than half is the pointed, graduated tail typical of all macaws, though the Scarlet Macaw has a larger percentage of tail than the other large Macaws. The average weight is about 1 kilogram (2.2 lb). The plumage is mostly scarlet, but the rump and tail-covert feathers are light blue, the greater upper wing coverts are yellow, the upper sides of the flight feathers of the wings are dark blue as are the ends of the tail feathers, and the undersides of the wing and tail flight feathers are dark red with metallic gold iridescence. Some individuals may have green in the wings.

Lifespan: The Scarlet Macaw can live up to 75 years in captivity, although a more typical lifespan is 40 to 50 years.

Diet: Scarlet Macaws eat mostly fruits, nuts and seeds, including large, hard seeds. A typical sighting is of a single bird or a pair flying above the forest canopy, though in some areas flocks can be seen. They may gather at clay licks.

Published in Birds & Parrots
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