Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Zebra Finches

Zebra Finches

Habitat: Zebra Finches inhabit a wide range of grasslands and forests, usually close to water. They are typically found in open steppes with scattered bushes and trees.

Subspecies: Taeniopygia guttata guttata, the Timor Zebra Finch, extends from Lombok in the Lesser Sunda Islands or Nusa Tenggara in Indonesia to Sermata, in addition to coastal areas around the continent of Australia. Taeniopygia guttata castanotis is found over the wide range of continental Australia. Song and other vocalizzation: Zebra Finches are loud and boisterous singers. Their calls can be a loud "beep", "meep", "oi!" or "a-ha!". Their song is a few small beeps, leading up to a rhythmic song of varying complexity in males. Each male's song is different, although birds of the same bloodline will exhibit similarities, and all finches will overlay their own uniqueness onto a common rhythmic framework. Sons generally learn the song of their fathers with little variation. Songs may change during puberty, but afterwards they are locked in for the life of the bird. Scientific research at Japan's RIKEN institute has suggested that singing to females is an emotionally rewarding experience for male Zebra Finches. Male Zebra Finches begin to sing at puberty, while females lack a singing ability.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Canaries

Canaries

Canaries are named after the Canary Islands, in Spain. However, the real etymology of the Canary Islands does not actually mean the "Islands of Canaries", deriving from Latin Insula Canaria (first referring just to Gran Canaria), with the meaning of "Island of Dogs" because it contained "vast multitudes of dogs of very large size".

Varieties: Canaries are generally divided into three main groups: Colorbred Canaries (bred for their many colour mutations - Ino, Eumo, Satinette, Bronze, Ivory, Onyx, Mosaic, Brown and Red Factor etc.), Type Canaries (bred for their shape and conformation - Border, Fife, Gloster, Gibber Italicus, Raza Española, Berner, Lancashire, Yorkshire, Mexicana, Australian Plainhead, etc.), and Song Canaries (bred for their unique and specific song patterns - Spanish Timbrado, German Roller (also known as "Harzer Roller"), Waterslager (also known as "Malinois"), American Singer, Russian Singer, Persian Singer). While wild canaries are a yellowish-green colour, domestic canaries have been selectively bred for a wide variety of colours, such as yellow, orange, brown, black, white, and red. (The colour red was introduced to the domesticated canary through hybridisation with the red siskin, a type of South American finch)

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Budgerigars

Budgerigars

Budgerigars also known as common pet parakeet or shell parakeet. nicknamed the budgie.

Description: Wild budgerigars average 18 cm (7 in) long, weigh 30–40 grams (1.1–1.4 oz), and display a light green body colour (abdomen and rumps), while their mantles (back and wing coverts) display pitch-black mantle markings (blackish in fledgelings and immatures) edged in clear yellow undulations. The forehead and face is yellow in adults but with blackish stripes down to the cere (nose) in young individuals until they change into their adult plumage around three to four months of age. They display small, purple cheek patches and a series of three black spots across each side of their throats (called throat spots). The two outermost throat spots are situated at the base of each cheek patch. The tail is cobalt (dark-blue); and outside tail feathers display central yellow flashes. Their wings have greenish-black flight feathers and black coverts with yellow fringes along with central yellow flashes, which only become visible in flight or when the wings are outstretched. Bills are olive grey and legs blueish-grey, with zygodactyl toes. Budgerigars are social animals and require stimulation in the shape of toys and interaction with humans or with other budgerigars. Budgerigars, and especially females, will chew material such as wood. Tame budgerigars can be taught to speak, whistle, and play with humans.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Lovebirds

Lovebirds

A lovebird is one of nine species of the genus Agapornis.

Decsription: Lovebirds are 13 to 17 centimeters in length and 40 to 60 grams in weight. They are among the smallest parrots, characterized by a stocky build, a short blunt tail, and a relatively large, sharp beak. Wildtype lovebirds are mostly green with a variety of colors on their upper body, depending on the species. The Fischer's lovebird, black-cheeked lovebird, and the masked lovebird have a prominent white ring around their eyes. Many color mutant varieties have been produced by selective breeding of the species that are popular in aviculture.

Temperament: Very active, curious, and playful, lovebirds pack a lot of personality into a small package. They are also feisty little birds. They are very social and form deep bonds with their owners and are sometimes very cuddly birds, but their intense personalities can also make them prone to nipping and territorial aggressiveness and jealousy. Hand-raised babies make the best pets. Some experts believe that females are more prone to jealousy and territoriality than males.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Cockatiel

Cockatiel

Color mutation: Fifteen different Cockatiel colour mutations are currently established in aviculture, including Grey, Pied, Pearled, Cinnamon, Whitefaced, Lutino, Albino (aka. Whitefaced Lutino) and Yellowcheeked Cockatiels. There are many mutations of Cockatiels with varied colors, they are: Silvestre, Harlequin, Lutino, Cinnamon, opaline (Pearl), Cara Black, Silver, Fawn, Albino (there is a pattern and not just albino genetic mutations), Pastel, Silver and Recessive silver dominant. At 300 mm to 330 mm (12 to 13 inches), the cockatiel is the smallest and only parakeet type of Cackatoo species. The latter ranaging between 300 mm to 600 mm (12-24 inches) in length.

Lifespan: The Cockatiel's lifespan in captivity is generally given as 15–20 years, though it is sometimes given as short as 10–15 years, and there are reports of Cockatiels living as long as 32 years, the oldest confirmed specimen reported being 36 years old. Diet and exercise are major determining factors in cockatiel lifespan.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Rosella

Rosella

Description: rosellas are medium-sized parrots with long tails.The feathers on their backs show an obvious scalloping appearance with colouring that differs between the species. All species have distinctive cheek patches. Sexual dimorphism is absent or slight - males and females generally have similar plumage, apart from the Western Rosella. The juveniles of the blue-cheeked species, and Western Rosella, all have a distinctive green-based plumage, while immature plumage of the white-cheeked species is merely a duller version of the adults.

Habitat: Rosellas are native to Australia and nearby islands, where they inhabit forests, woodlands, farmlands, and suburban parks and gardens.

Behaviour: Rosellas feed predominantly on seeds and fruit, with food held in the foot. They enjoy bathing in puddles of water in the wild and in captivity. Rosellas scratch their heads with the foot behind the wing. Mutual preening is not exhibited by the genus, and the courtship display is simple; the male waves his tail sideways, and engages in some head bobbing, and the female reciprocates.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Ringneck Parakeet

Ringneck Parakeet

Common Name: Indian Ringneck Parakeet, Indian Ringneck Parrot, Rose-Ringed Parrot. Size: Medium, at about 16 inches in length including the tailfeathers.

Averange Lifespan: Between 25 - 30 years, although instances of Ringnecks living past the age of fifty have been authenticated.

Temperament: Although the Indian Ringneck has something of a reputation for being nippy and hard to tame, it is largely undeserved. Because they are so smart, Ringnecks get bored very easily, and will often resort to chewing and other destructive behavior if left to their own devices. They also go through a bluffing stage during adolescence that is difficult for some owners to manage. Ringnecks that are handled often and properly cared for, however, generally have sweet, charming personalities that make them a favorite of bird enthusiasts everywhere.

Colors: Ringnecks are available in shades ranging from bright yellows, greens, and blues, to albinos. Like a few other bird species, they are known as dimorphic, meaning that a bird's sex can be determined by its colors and markings. Males sport deep red beaks, black facial markings, and three bands or color around their necks. Females, while still beautiful, lack the facial and collar bands, although some do display a barely slight darkening of color around their necks.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Yellow Crown Amazon

Yellow Crown Amazon

The yellow-crowned amazon or yellow-crowned parrot (Amazona ochrocephala), is a species of parrot, native to the tropical South America and Panama. The taxonomy is highly complex, and the yellow-headed (A. oratrix) and yellow-naped amazon (A. auropalliata) are sometimes considered subspecies of the yellow-crowned amazon. The Yellow-crowned Amazon is generally green with yellow-green on the under parts. Its name is derived from the patch of yellow the crown. There are dark black edges to the feathers on the back of the head, and a bright red on the edge of its wing and speculum. The tail is also yellow-green underneath with a red spot at the base of each feather. The eye is orange surrounded by an unfeathered white ring. The beak is light gray with some pink on the upper part close to the base, and the legs are gray. Food and Breeding: They are normally found in pairs or small flocks up to 30, but larger groups may gather at clay licks. Their food includes fruits, nuts, seeds and berries. Foods with sugar and a large amount of salt can be dangerous for them.

Behaviour: The Yellow-fronted Amazon is a very fun, smart and affectionate parrot. These birds are quite intelligent so are easy to tame and train. They will quickly begin to mimic sounds and can become a very good talker. Being very social, they enjoy companionship and become fast friends with their owner.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Blue Fronted Amazon

Blue Fronted Amazon

The blue-fronted amazon (Amazona aestiva), also called the turquoise-fronted amazon and blue-fronted parrot, is a South American species of amazon parrot and one of the most common amazon parrots kept in captivity as a pet or companion parrot. Its common name is derived from the distinctive blue marking on its head just above its beak. The blue-fronted amazon is a mainly green parrot about 38 cm (15 in) long. They have blue feathers on the forehead above the beak and yellow on the face and crown. Distribution of blue and yellow varies greatly among individuals. Unlike most other Amazona parrots, its beak is mostly black. There is no overt sexual dimorphism to the human eye, but analysis of the feathers using spectrometry, a method which allows the plumage to be seen as it would be by a parrot's tetrachromatic vision, shows clear differences between the plumage of the sexes. Juveniles of parrots are duller and have dark irises.

Published in Birds & Parrots
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

Double Yellow Headed Amazon

Double Yellow Headed Amazon

Scientific Name: Amazona oratrix. Description: Double Yellow-Headed Amazons are quite large, measuring about 16 inches in length from the beak to the tip of the tail feathers.

Temperament: Double Yellow-Headed Amazons make wonderful, affectionate pets when handfed and raised from a young age. Highly gifted and possessing incredible speech abilities, the Double Yellow-Headed Amazon is a charming bird who loves being the center of attention. Like many parrots, however, Double Yellow-Headed Amazons may go through a hormonal bluffing stage as they reach sexual maturity. For this reason, they are recommended for experienced bird owners.

Colors: Mostly green, these birds feature bright yellow feathers on their heads and faces, with splashes of yellow and red on the front edges of the wings. They have horn colored beaks and flesh colored feet.

Published in Birds & Parrots
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