Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Yellow Discus

Yellow Discus

The Yellow Marlboro Discus has been selectively bred for its brilliant yellow coloration. The body is mostly yellow in color, and may have some red in the fins, as well as faint black stripes. The Anal and dorsal fins have electric blue stripes that add to the appeal of this fish. The overall coloration of Discus will vary depending on mood and overall health of the fish. The Discus has surpassed the Angelfish as the most popular freshwater aquarium fish. Depending on sub-species, the natural range of the Discus extends from the Amazon to the Rio Negro Regions of South America.

Published in Fresh Water Fish
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Sucker Fish

Sucker Fish

Sucker (family Catostomidae), any of the freshwater fishes constituting the family Catostomidae, similar to and closely related to the carp and minnows (Cyprinidae). There are about 80 to 100 species of suckers. Except for a few species in Asia, all are North American. Many suckers are almost indistinguishable from minnows, but catostomids may often be recognized by the sucking, usually ventral mouth with protrusible lips. Suckers live on the bottom of lakes and slow streams and feed by sucking up invertebrates and plants. They are generally rather sluggish fishes. The species vary considerably in size.

Published in Fresh Water Fish
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Spotted Corydoras

Spotted Corydoras

The spotted corydoras, longnose corydoras or Agassiz's catfish, Corydoras ambiacus, is a tropical freshwater fish belonging to the Corydoradinae sub-family of the Callichthyidae family. It originates in inland waters in South America, and is found in the upper Amazon Riverbasin in Brazil, Colombia and Peru. The fish will grow in length up to 1.9 inches (4.9 centimeters). It lives in a tropical climate in water with a 6.0 - 8.0 pH, a water hardness of 2 - 25 dGH, and a temperature range of 70 - 75 °F (21 - 24 °C). It feeds on worms, benthic crustaceans, insects, and plant matter.

Published in Fresh Water Fish
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Snake Skin Discus

Snake Skin Discus

With many names based on colored varieties resulting from controlled breeding, Symphysodon aequifasciatus is referred to as the Snakeskin Discus. The Snakeskin Discus has a mottled blue appearance against a red background. The overall coloration of Discus will vary depending on mood and overall health of the fish. The Discus has surpassed the Angelfish as the most popular freshwater aquarium fish. Depending on sub-species, the natural range of the Discus extends from the Amazon to the Rio Negro Regions of South America.

Published in Fresh Water Fish
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Rummy Nose

Rummy Nose

The Rummy-Nose Tetra gets its name from the red blushing across its nose and face. But its beautiful coloration does not end there. Hemigrammus bleheri has a mirror-like silver body and a jet-black tail striped with white. This color pattern adds a simple, yet striking beauty to any freshwater aquarium. The Rummy-Nose Tetra is a peaceful omnivore that makes an excellent addition to community aquariums with non-aggressive tankmates.

Published in Fresh Water Fish
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Red Tiger Oscar

Red Tiger Oscar

Oscars move with a slow, majestic appearance, but they can be quite destructive to their surroundings, as they tend to uproot plants, and move other objects in their tanks. They are a very peaceful fish among others of similar size, but will eat anything small enough to fit in their mouths, and can quite easily be trained to eat from their owner's hand. Oscars will frequently fight vigorously with each other, which leads to much chasing and splashing, although they typically do not hurt each other. Oscars are best kept in a 200L tank with a medium textured substrate. It is also recommended to place oscars only with larger fish since they have been known to eat smaller fish that are introduced into their environment. An intelligent fish, if the oscar is raised with a set of fish, it will tend to leave them alone, but will attack newly introduced fish, even if they are of a similar size and species, as ones already there.

Published in Fresh Water Fish
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Red Telescope Eye

Red Telescope Eye

The Red Telescope Goldfish may have traditional metallic red/orange coloration but thanks to its distinct telescope eyes, it makes an eye-catching addition for the goldfish enthusiast. The Red Telescope Goldfish is also known as the Dragon Eye Goldfish and Celestial Eye Goldfish. The most stunning feature of the Red Telescope Goldfish is the large protruding eyes that is said to resemble those of a dragon. The Telescope variety of fancy goldfish has long been considered the most representative goldfish of China.

Published in Fresh Water Fish
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Red Cap Oranda

Red Cap Oranda

The Red Cap Oranda is one of several varieties of what is commonly known as the Goldfish, Carassius auratus auratus. The Goldfish originally came from parts of Asia, Japan, and China but now enjoys worldwide distribution due to controlled breeding programs. The Red Cap Oranda is typically a metallic-scaled fish. Resembling the Veil Tail varieties, the Oranda's distinction is in the "hood" that covers its head. In the case of the Red Cap Oranda, this hood is a predominant, bright red, while the body is an iridescent white.

Published in Fresh Water Fish
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Moon Tail Molly

Moon Tail Molly

Published in Fresh Water Fish
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Leopard Corydoras

Leopard Corydoras

Leopard Cory (Corydoras trilineatus) Usually when properly conditioned, the difference between the male and female Corydora becomes quite evident. Females have a larger underbelly, when viewed from the top will look a lot wider than a male. Males are smaller in length than females also. Very peaceful community fish. Will not intentionally bother tank inhabitants, however their bumbling about the tank may bother more delicate fish or other bottom dwellers. Are best kept in groups of 3-4 or more.

Published in Fresh Water Fish
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