Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Zoanthus

Zoanthus

Zoanthus is a genus of soft coral, anthozoans in the order Zoanthidae. It is the name genus for its family and order. Zoanthids are prized in the fishkeeping hobby, being relatively easy to raise and very colorful. Known as "button polyps", "zoos", or "zoas" they can spread to completely cover a rock with brightly colored circular patterns.

Published in Corals
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Vase Sponge

Vase Sponge

Callyspongia vaginalis, known as the branching vase sponge is a demosponge. This species is frequently colonized by Parazoanthus parasiticus, a colonial anemone, and Ophiothrix suensonii, a brittle star. It feeds on plankton and detritus. The color of C. vaginalis is variable, ranging from lavender to brownish-gray to greenish-gray and sometimes light tan. C. vaginalis usually has a tubular growth pattern, although the magnitude of the current affects its growth form. The long, erect tubes taper slightly and have a wide vent up to 2.5 cm in diameter with a thin wall. The sponge has very elastic tubes that vary in length and can stand singly or with other tubes. The sponge is rough with its irregular pits and nubs covering its surface. The species is found on hard surfaces, usually reef plateaus and deep reef slopes.

Published in Corals
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Sun Coral

Sun Coral

Tubastraea, also known as sun coral or sun polyps, is a genus of coral in the phylum Cnidaria. It is a cup coral in the family Dendrophylliidae. Sun corals belong to a group of corals known as large-polyp stony corals. This means that while they produce a hard skeleton, they do not build reefs. Different species have polyps in a variety of colors, including yellow, orange, and shades of black.

Published in Corals
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Sinularia

Sinularia

Sinularia is a very hardy soft coral that is comparable in shape to Nepthea corals; however the Sinularia coral grows to have a much more substantial stalk. The strain that we are propagating has an intense fluorescent green base color with lighter greenish-yellow polyps. Sinularia are photosynthetic so you do not have to target feed them and they will thrive in diverse water conditions from nutrient rich to ultra-pure. Interestingly, the texture of this coral is very slippery, but no slime is produced.

Published in Corals
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Sea Fan

Sea Fan

Sea Fans are similar to soft corals, however, they anchor themselves in mud or sand instead of attaching themselves to hard substrates. Some Sea Fans require up to 8 inches of sand. Most Sea Fans are nocturnal, only extending their polyps during the nighttime hours. They consume plankton and require strong currents to carry their food.

Published in Corals
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Sarcophyton

Sarcophyton

There are about 35 species in the genus Sarcophyton which are difficult to distinguish. The Toadstool Leather is a soft coral which builds mushroom or toadstool-shaped colonies of up to 50 cm in diameter with many polyps on the top. In some species the margin of the hat is warped. There are two forms of polyps: autozoids which are more than 1 cm tall, have 8 feathered tentacles and can retract completely; siphonozoids being tiny tube-like regressed polyps which are responsible for the intake and release of water. The body of the colony is sustained by calcareous pins, called spicules. The colour of the body may be white, yellow, brown or green. Polyps are of the same colour but in some species the autozoids are white.

Published in Corals
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Ricordea Florida

Ricordea Florida

Ricordea florida is a species of coral of the family Ricordeidae and the order Corallimorpharia, whose members are also called false corals. Due to their bright pigmentation, Ricordea florida is very popular in hobby saltwater aquariums. Ricordea florida is a coral without a skeleton, having the same internal anatomical structure as corals of the order Scleractinia. The body of the coral is small and cylindrical. The basal end resembles a flat disk that functions as a foot. The apical end is the oral disk which functions as one or more mouths. These mouths are centered amid short rounded tentacles bearing cnidoctios, whose sting contains paralytic neurotoxins. The sting is used to ingest prey more easily via the gastrovascular cavity, or as a defensive mechanism to evade enemies. The stinging ability of this species is lower than in most corals.

Published in Corals
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Long Tentacle Anemone

Long Tentacle Anemone

The Long Tentacle Anemone is also referred to as the Corkscrew Anemone, Sand Anemone, Red Base Anemone, and Long Tentacle Red Base Anemone. It has a similar appearance to Heteractis crispa, which has more tentacles and a tougher column. Its oral disc is usually visible and can grow up to 20" in diameter. Its tentacles are spaced further apart than other similar anemones. It is found in various forms and color patterns, but its base is usually orange to red. It is a host to clownfish, usually Amphiprion perideraion and A. clarki.

Published in Corals
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Goniopora

Goniopora

Goniopora is a genus of hermatypic, zooxanthellate corals. Goniopora spp. have polyps with 24 tentacles, unlike their close relatives from the genus Alveopora which all have twelve. These corals thrive in plankton-rich waters. Plankton uptake is usually not visible macroscopically, however particles in the pico- and nanoplankton ranges (2 - 20 μm), such as bacteria and small protozoa, may be taken up by beating cilia and flagella located on and inside the polyps.

Published in Corals
Monday, 08 December 2014 00:00

Dendronephthya

Dendronephthya/Frogspawn

The Frogspawn Coral is a large polyp stony coral (LPS) often referred to as the Wall, Octopus, Grape, or Honey Coral. Its polyps remain visible throughout both the day and night, resembling a mass of fish eggs or frog eggs, hence one of its common names Frogspawn. Its coloration is green or brown to tan in color. With its appearance and coloration it would make a nice addition to any reef aquarium. During the evenings, its sweeper tentacles can extend up to six inches beyond its base into the reef aquarium surroundings. It will sting other neighboring corals in the reef aquarium, therefore, it is best to leave plenty of room between itself and other types of corals.

Published in Corals
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